If you are a LANDOWNER and would like your tenant to receive the certification paperwork, please contact our office with your information.

If you are a TENANT and would like to receive the certification paperwork, please contact our office with your information.

If you receive the paperwork and can’t meet with us in the allowed time, please contact our office to make other arrangements.

To see a map of how each county was broken down into sub-areas, please click on RegionsMap.

To check on the ongoing progress of certifying irrigated acres, please click   here.

If you do not agree with the NRDs assessment of irrigated acres, other information that you may bring in to help prove your case includes the following:

FSA records,

County Assessor records,

UDSA records,

Any other information you feel might benefit your cause.

ANNUAL NITROGEN AND WATER MANAGEMENT REPORT- PRINT

Instructions


ANNUAL NITROGEN AND WATER MANAGEMENT REPORT- DOWNLOAD

Instructions

This is a spreadsheet created using Microsoft Excel ’97.


ANNUAL NITROGEN AND WATER MANAGEMENT REPORT- DOWNLOAD

Instructions

This is a spreadsheet created using Microsoft Excel ’97.


TOTAL N NEEDED FOR EXPECTED YIELD (lbs/Ac) – DOWNLOAD

Use this table to find the figure for line 7 on your Annual Nitrogen and Water Management Report


CORN NITROGEN CALCULATION WORKSHEET – DOWNLOAD

This is a spreadsheet created using Microsoft Excel ’97.

Irrigation System – Drip

To apply irrigation water efficiently to the plant root zone, in order to maintain soil moisture within the range for good plant growth without excessive water loss, erosion, reduction in water quality, or salt accumulation.

Well Abandonment

To close ground water wells that are no longer in working use to prevent pollutants from entering the ground water. Financial assistance is available through state and local funding by the Twin Platte Natural Resources District.

Irrigation System – Sprinkler

To efficiently and uniformly apply irrigation water to maintain adequate soil moisture for optimum plant growth without causing excessive water loss, erosion, or reduced water quality.

 Irrigation System – Surface and Sub-Surface

To efficiently convey and distribute irrigation water to the point of application without excessive erosion, water loss, or reduction in water quality.

Pipelines for Irrigation

To provide a permanent conveyance facility for water from the supply of water, to the source receiving the water; hence, conserving ground or surface water.

Best Management Practices – Water

To get the most efficient and effective use of irrigation water and fertilizer, without over or under applying, at the most economical benefit.

Irrigation Scheduling

To conserve ground water by applying precise amounts of water to crops at necessary stages of crop development.

Pest Management

To develop a pest management program consistent with selected crop production goals that are environmentally acceptable.

Water Trailer

To promote and educate the public about ground water and surface water by using hands on learning. Contact the Twin Platte Natural Resources District to schedule a presentation for your group.

Flood Control – Brule & Ogallala Watersheds

To impound runoff, conserve water, prevent erosion, prevent pollution, and to enhance ground water recharge.

Water Quality – Nitrates

To prevent ground water contamination of nitrates and other pollutants by monitoring current water composition. The Natural Resources District has monitored for nitrates for 15 years.

Water Quantity – Flow Meter

A tool to measure irrigation water that could benefit water conservation. The Twin Platte Natural Resources District staff is available to help producers on-site to measure flows.

Riparian Buffer

To reduce excess amounts of sediment, organic material, nutrients, pesticides, and other pollutants in surface runoff; reduce excess nutrients and other chemicals in shallow ground water; moderate water temperatures to improve habitat for fish and other aquatic organisms; provide a source of organic matter and large woody debris for fish and other aquatic organisms; lessen detrimental impacts to riparian areas including stream channels and adjacent lands caused by high and low water flows; reduce the rate of lateral stream channel movements; provide habitat for cover for numerous species of wildlife during periods of their life cycle; and produce wood products such as lumber, firewood, and posts.

Irrigation System – Tail Water Recovery

To conserve farm irrigation water supplies and water quality by collecting the irrigation water that runs off the surface of sloping fields, and making this water available for reuse on the farm.

Irrigation Water Conveyance

To reduce water loss, prevent water logging of land, prevent erosion, and maintain water quality. This may be defined as a fixed lining of impervious material in an existing or newly constructed irrigation field ditch, irrigation canal, or lateral.

Irrigation Water Management

To effectively use available irrigation water supply in managing and controlling the moisture environment of crops to promote the desired crop response, to minimize soil erosion and loss of plant nutrients, to control undesirable water loss, and to protect water quality.

Nutrient Management

To supply plant nutrients for optimum forage and crop yields, or to supply nutrients while minimizing entry of nutrients to surface and ground water.

Trough or Tank

To provide watering facilities for livestock at selected locations that will protect vegetative cover through proper distribution of grazing, or through better grassland management for erosion control.

Wells

To supply ground water from different types of wells, including domestic, irrigation, and livestock wells. Construction and operation of these wells must follow specific rules regulated by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services for the protection of the water quality.

Diversions

To divert excess water from areas to sites where it can be used or disposed of safely. A diversion is classified as a channel with a supporting ridge on the lower side constructed across the slope. It is important to note that there are several sites where this practice may or may not apply.

Construction of Water and Sediment Control Basins

To reduce on-site erosion, reduce sediment, reduce sediment content in water, intercept and conduct surface runoff through sub-surface conduits to stable outlets, and reduce peak rate or volume of flow at down slope locations. Water and Sediment Control Basins reduce flooding, prevent gully development, and reform the land surface.

Filter Strips

To remove sediment and other pollutants from runoff or waste water by filtration, infiltration, absorption, decomposition, and volatilization, thereby reducing pollution and protecting the environment. A filter strip is defined as a strip or area of vegetation for removing sediment, organic matter, and other pollutants from runoff and waste water.

Grassed Waterway

To provide for the disposal of excess surface water from terraces, diversions, or from natural concentrations without causing erosion or flooding, and to improve water quality. To be classified a grassed waterway it must be a natural or constructed channel that is shaped or graded to require suitable vegetation established for the stable conveyance of runoff.

Irrigation Re-Use Pit

To collect and store water until it can be used beneficially to satisfy crop irrigation requirements.

Conservation Cover

To reduce soil erosion and sedimentation, improve water quality, and create or enhance wildlife habitat. Establishing and maintaining perennial vegetative cover to protect soil and water resources on land retired from agricultural production, including land entered into retirement programs.

Cross Wind Strips

To practice as part of a conservation management system for support of the reduction of soil erosion from wind, reduce the transport of wind-born sediment and sediment-borne contaminants, and to protect growing crops from damage by wind-borne soil particles. Herbaceous covers, resistant to wind erosion, established in strips across the prevailing wind direction works well for cropland. Establishing narrow strips perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction may do this.

Multi-Purpose Dam

To provide distinct and specific storage allocations for two or more of the following purposes: floodwater retardation, irrigation, fishing, hunting, boating, swimming, or other recreational use, improve environment or habitat for fish or wildlife, municipal, industrial, and other uses. A dam is classified as being constructed across a stream or natural watercourse, with design reservoir storage capacity designed specifically for two or more purposes.

Wetland Restoration

To restore both the hydrology and the wetland plant communities to conditions similar to those that existed before site modification.

Critical Area Planting

To stabilize the soil, reduce damage from sediment and runoff to downstream areas, improve wildlife habitat, and visual resources. Planting vegetation such as trees, shrubs, vines, grasses, or legumes on highly erodible or critically eroding areas.

Riparian Buffers

To reduce excess amounts of sediment, organic material, nutrients, pesticides, and other pollutants in surface runoff; reduce excess nutrients and other chemicals in shallow groundwater; moderate water temperatures to improve habitat for fish and other aquatic organisms; provide a source of organic matter and large woody debris for fish and other aquatic organisms; lessen detrimental impacts to riparian areas including stream channels and adjacent lands caused by high and low water flows; reduce the rate of lateral stream channel movement; provide habitat for cover for numerous species of wildlife during periods of their life cycle; and produce wood products such as lumber, firewood, and posts.

Terraces

To reduce slope length, erosion, and sediment content in runoff water; intercept and conduct surface runoff at a non-erosive velocity to a stable outlet; retain runoff for moisture conservation; prevent gully development; reform the land surface; improve farmability; reduce flooding; or improve water quality. A terrace is considered an earth embankment, a channel, or a combination ridge and channel constructed across the slope.

Tree Planting

To establish or reinforce a stand of trees to conserve soil and moisture, control snow drifting, prevent wind damage to farmsteads, provide shelter for livestock, beautify an area, protect a watershed, or improve an area for wildlife and production of wood crops. To see conservation trees and shrub varieties available state-wide, click on the link. For trees and shrubs available locally in the TPNRD, contact Dave at the TPNRD office in North Platte.

Residue Management

This practice may be applied as part of a conservation management system to support reduced sheet and till erosion, reduced wind erosion, conserve soil moisture, manage snow to increase available plant moisture or reduce plant damage from freezing or drifting, and provide food and cover for wildlife. Residue management is managing the amount, orientation, and distribution of crop and other plant residues on the soil surface year-round, while growing crops in narrow slots or tilled strips in previously untilled soil and residue.

Grade Stabilization Structures

To stabilize the grade and control erosion in natural or artificial channels, to prevent the formation or advancement of gullies, and to enhance environmental quality and reduce pollution hazards.

Waste Management Systems

To manage waste in rural areas in a manner that prevents or minimizes degradation of air, soil, and water resources, and protects public health and safety. Such systems are planned to preclude discharge of pollutants to surface or ground water, and to recycle waste through soil and plants to the fullest extent practicable.

2016 Annual Report of water use activities in the Twin Platte NRD – FINAL 071917

IMP Stakeholders as of 2007

 

Timeline for the Completion of the IMP

 

Certification of Irrigated Acres

 

Integrated Management Plans

Basin-Wide Integrated Management Plan (IMP)

Twin Platte Natural Resources District – IMP – Legal Notice

Order Adopting the Basin-Wide Plan for Joint Integrated Water Resources Management of Over-Appropriated Portions of the Platte River Basin, Nebraska

Order Designating Integrated Management Subareas and Adoption of Controls in the Integrated Management Plan

Order Amending the Integrated Management Plan

Twin Platte Natural Resources District – IMP

Twin Platte Natural Resources District – IMP – Legal Notice

Annual Reports

Annual Report of Water Use Activities 2010 – TPNRD

Annual Report of Water Use Activities 2010 – DNR

Annual Report of Water Use Activities 2011 – TPNRD

Annual Report of Water Use Activities 2011 – DNR

Annual Report of Water Use Activities 2012 – TPNRD

Annual Report of Water Use Activities 2013 – TPNRD

Annual Report of Water Use Activities 2014 – TPNRD

Annual Report of Water Use Activities 2015 – TPNRD

Annual Report of Water Use Activities 2016 – TPNRD

District-Wide Ground Water Management Area

Rules and Regulations

Maps & Legals

Map of Well Drilling Suspension & Stays on Irrigated Acres

Map of Current & Future Moratoriums

Ground Water Management Plan

Chapter 1 Introduction

Chapter 2 Hydrogeologic Characterization

Chapter 3 Land Use And Contamination Source Inventory

Chapter 4 Water Usage And Demand

Chapter 5 Data Collection

Chapter 6 Ground Water Goals And Objectives

Chapter 7 Endangered And Threatened Species

Chapter 8 Ground Water Quantity

Chapter 9 Ground Water Quality

Chapter 10 Plan For Action

Brush Management

To improve or restore a quality plant cover to reduce sediment and improve water quality; increase quality and production of desirable plants for livestock and wildlife; maintain or increase wildlife habitat values; enhance aesthetic and recreation qualities; create open areas; and protect life and property.

Fencing

To exclude livestock or big game from areas that should be protected from grazing; confine livestock or big game on an area to prevent trespassing; control domestic livestock while permitting wildlife movement; subdivide grazing land to permit use of grazing; regulate access to areas by people; protect stockwater impoundments from livestock use.

Wildlife Habitat Improvement

To create, maintain, or enhance suitable habitat areas, including wetlands, for food and cover to sustain desired kinds of upland wildlife.

Range Seeding

To prevent excessive soil and water loss and improve water quality; produce more forage for grazing or browsing animals on rangeland or land converted to range from other uses; and improve the visual quality of grazing land.

Water Pipelines

To transport surface/ground water from one area to another without causing erosion and reducing the chance of evaporation. Additional water sources can be useful in managing livestock distribution.

Prescribed Burning

To control undesirable vegetation; prepare sites for planting or seeding; control plant disease; reduce fire hazards; improve wildlife habitat, forage production, and forage quality; and to facilitate distribution of grazing and browsing animals.

Wells

To supply ground water from different types of wells, including domestic, irrigation, and livestock. Construction and operation of these wells must follow specific rules and regulations by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services for the protection of water quality.

Proper Grazing Use

To increase the vigor and reproduction of key plants; accumulate litter and mulch necessary to reduce erosion and sedimentation and improve water quality; improve or maintain condition of the vegetation; increase forage production; maintain natural beauty; and reduce the hazards of wildfire.

Windbreak/Shelterbelt Establishment

To protect soil resources, control snow deposition, prevent wind damage to farmsteads, provide shelter for livestock, beautify an area, or improve an area for wildlife.

Pasture & Hayland Planting

To establish adapted cool-season grasses or legumes to extend length of grazing season; produce a high quality forage product; provide an emergency forage source; and reduce soil erosion by wind and/or water.

Spring Development

To improve the distribution of water or to increase the quantity of livestock water supplies. Development may also be made for irrigation, domestic, wildlife, or fishponds if water is available in suitable quantity and quality.

Pasture & Hayland Management

To prolong life of desirable forage species, to maintain or improve the quality and quantity of forage, and to protect the soils, reduce water loss, and improve water quality.

Corners for Wildlife

To provide habitat in the corners of tracts with center pivots, which enhance wildlife production.

Noxious Weed Awareness

To promote identification and awareness of how noxious weeds reduce productivity of land.

Planned Grazing Systems

To maintain existing plant cover or hasten its improvement while properly using the forage of grazing units; reduce erosion and improve water quality; increase efficiency of grazing by uniformly using pasture units; help ensure a supply of forage throughout the grazing season; improve plant vigor and quality and increase forage production; enhance wildlife habitat; and promote flexibility in the grazing programs and buffer the adverse effects of drought.

Water Trailer

trailerThe water trailer is a hands on educational tool, which the District personnel uses to educate children about water and its many different relationships. The water trailer was partially funded by a special grant from the Environmental Protection Agency through the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality, under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act. The water trailer uses recycled plastic for sand. Water running through the plastic simulates the flow of a river, erosion, sedimentation, ground water movement, channelization, watersheds, impacts on wildlife, and the effect humans have on water.

The water trailer is roughly nine feet by seven feet, and is used mostly outside because of its size. It is large enough to comfortably accommodate 25-30 students at one time. Due to weather restrictions, the trailer is used in late spring, summer, and early fall, but use is not limited to these times.

The water trailer can be used for K-6 and up. We can have a scenario prepared or we can tailor the learning to what is being taught in a class. For the younger children, demonstrations last 10-15 minutes. For older students, it depends on their interests. We can fit the water trailer into most schedules, but do require time to re-build the model in between different groups.

The water trailer works well for science fairs, to complement a science lesson, or for a fun learning experience the class won’t forget! There is no charge to have District personnel demonstrate the water trailer, no matter how many times we present it.

Some comments made by students who have attended the Water Expo

“My favorite thing was the river system model. It is just so much easier to understand when you see what they are talking about.” – Alissa A.

“I liked how we got to see how the river system model worked and how one little thing like moving trees can cause bigger things to happen like erosion.” – Jack B.

“It was fascinating to see the shaping of the land caused by a real river.” – Melynda A.

“The river system model was the coolest model I have ever seen.” – Codi C.

“My favorite place was probably the wetlands. There I liked the riparian model. I liked that place because you got to dig holes and watch the water rise in them. You also got to see the ground erode and watch currents form. I probably learned the most at the riparian model.” – Ryan C.

“I liked the riparian model. It was cool and a good display on how to teach what a river does. I learned a lot from that!” – Amy B.


Scholarships


Range Youth Camp

The purpose of this camp is to provide education to youth in Nebraska, ages 14-18, who are interested in rangelands and practical range management. They develop an awareness of the extent, importance, and value of Nebraska’s greatest renewable resource; develop an appreciation of the value of optimum range and livestock management; encourage leadership and good rangeland stewardship by Nebraska youth through increased awareness of natural resource issues; and develop an awareness of information sources for evaluating management alternatives.

The program emphasizes plant-soil-animal relationships, range livestock management, ranching, economics, and wildlife habitat management. The weeks emphasis is on field and classroom activities designed to provide management education.

Natural Resources Camp

The purpose of this camp is to provide youth, ages 11-15, an opportunity to gain experience in leadership and knowledge about natural resources. Activities include field trips, visiting a working ranch, and numerous hands-on exercises.

Miscellaneous Scholarships

Other scholarships may be available for students and teachers per request for environmental and conservation education, and will be taken on a case-by-case basis. For more information on any of the scholarships, please contact our office.


Outdoor Classrooms

outdoorclassThe idea of an Outdoor Classroom was launched in March of 1976 when the seventh grade science students petitioned the Ogallala City Council to set aside a sandy weed patch site as a nature study area.

Assisted by the City, the Twin Platte Natural Resources District, the Soil Conservation Service, and Clarence Collister, the Junior High students along with their science instructor, George Acker, developed a 12-acre oasis along the south side of the South Platte River just west of the Holiday Inn.

“It is a place where people can observe plants and animals without upsetting natural systems, and where students can observe nature and understand it better.”

With the help of other organizations, we want to develop the area even further by making it a more accessible park to tourists, people of surrounding communities, and for students interested in studying nature.


bradyIn 1992, the Village of Brady gave their old landfill a new look, transforming the site into a wildlife habitat preserve and wilderness area. The 11 acre project provides wilderness footpaths, benches for resting and bird watching, and a parking area in addition to the wildlife habitat preserve. Thanks to the Game and Parks Commission which provided financial assistance for the trees, the Twin Platte Natural Resources District for developing the tree plans and planting the trees, and the Village of Brady for providing the space for the preserve.


Demonstration Plots

oneThe Twin Platte Natural Resources District works one-on-one with Producers, as shown in the picture.


Flow Meter Use

flowThe Twin Platte Natural Resources District has a portable ultrasonic flow meter thanks to a 319 grant from the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality. The flow meter can provide producers flow rates on their irrigation systems. The actual flow rate is measured in gallons per minute, which is very important for proper irrigation management.

The District believes that producers are attempting to use water as efficiently as possible to conserve the available water, and to minimize costs. Results have shown that many producers are applying different amounts of water for irrigation than they realize. With the knowledge provided by the District’s portable flow meter, the producer will know the amount of water that is pumped and can optimize the use of water for irrigation.

If excess water is applied, fuel and water are wasted and the application of excess water can contribute to leaching of fertilizer and other agri-chemicals out of the root zone, where it is of no value to the crop and can pollute the ground water.

There is no service fee to offset part of the District’s staff and travel cost when using the ultrasonic flow meter for determining the flow of irrigation water for a producer.

EQIP:

Critical conservation concerns decided by local citizens are targeted. Technical assistance is provided and incentives paid to operators who enter into 5-10 year contracts. The majority of the funds are targeted toward priority areas. Applications for EQIP may be obtained by contacting either NRCS, FSA, NRD, or Cooperative Extension.

CRP:

Two different sign-ups are available, both working to protect environmentally sensitive land. The general sign-up offers cost-share for grass seedlings, tree practices, wildlife habitat, diversions, erosion control structures, and wetland restoration. It is best to check with your NRCS office for sign-up dates. The continuous sign-up is available any time during the year, and offers cost-share for certain high priority conservation practices.

WHIP/WILD (State):

This is a cooperative program involving the NGPC and the NRD. The purpose is to create new wildlife habitat or enhance existing habitat on private lands. Cost-share is available with annual payments, requires a minimum of five acres and a 5-10 year contract.

NSWCP:

A state funded cost-share program administered by the local NRD for soil and water conservation practices. NRCS provides technical assistance.

Urban Forestry:

Twin Platte NRD, in cooperation with participating communities, provides incentives for persons in urban areas to plant up to two trees. Financial assistance of up to 50%; will not exceed $50 per tree.

Well Abandonment Fund:

Twin Platte NRD provides financial assistance of up to 65% of the cost to seal a well to prevent pollutants from entering the ground water.

Pheasants Forever:

Incentives to provide for the creation and enhancement of wildlife habitat, including providing food plots, nesting cover, wetland restoration, shelterbelts, and existing habitat protection.

Wildlife Shelterbelt:

NGPC promotes creating shelterbelts to improve wildlife habitat. Financial assistance is available, with a minimum time requirement of at least a 20 year contract.

SIP:

The NFS provides cost share to help private landowners plant, protect, and enhance their forest and related resources. Eligible practices include tree planting, forest improvement, windbreak establishment and renovation, riparian improvement, and wildlife habitat improvement. Minimum enrollment is one acre.

Wetland Initiative Program:

Offers landowners an opportunity to protect, restore, enhance, and create shallow water wetlands for the benefit of waterfowl and wildlife on their property. NGPC reimburses 100% for the development costs under approved development projects.

WHIP/WILD (USDA):

A voluntary program to improve wildlife and fish habitat on private lands. Priorities include riparian area restoration, native prairie renovation, and native grassland establishment with habitats predominately in irrigated cropland areas. Cost-share is available with a minimum of a 10 year contract.

Any person who applies fertilizers or pesticides through irrigation water must be certified. For new applicator certification, producers must attend a training session and pass a written exam. Sessions will be held:

Date Time Location
February 23, 2017 9:00 am CT Courthouse, Stapleton, NE
February 28, 2017 1:00 pm CT WCREC, North Platte, NE
March 10, 2017 1:00 pm CT WCREC, North Platte, NE
March 28, 2017 9:00 am MT Arterburn Youth Bldg, Ogallala, NE
April 4, 2017 1 pm CT WCREC, North Platte, NE

WCREC stands for West Central Research & Extension Center

PLEASE RSVP for NP Sessions

Note: Please bring a calculator, a pen, and a pencil.

For chemigation applicators RENEWING their certification, an internet based training program is available at:
water.unl.edu/cropswater/chemigation

You can complete the series of training modules on-line, but the testing phase needs to be completed at a designated test site.

Chuck Burr at the WCREC is the designated tester for our area.

Please contact him for more information 308-696-6783.

2017 Chemigation Applicator Training Dates

A guide to the regulations and requirements of Nebraska law affecting chemigators in the Twin Platte Natural Resources District.

CHEMIGATION APPLICATORS MUST BE CERTIFIED:

Whether or not the permit holder is certified, the person who actually applies chemicals through an irrigation system MUST be certified.

Certification consists of attending a course of instruction offered by the University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension, passing a written exam, and receiving the yellow chemigation certification card.

Check with the Twin Platte Natural Resources District or County Extension Office for dates and times of the courses.Certification is good for four years, after which renewals are required.

The Twin Platte Natural Resources District should be notified by the permit-holder of a change of certified applicators.

Reporting Accidents:

An actual or suspected accident, relating to the use of chemigation, must be reported within 24 hours of its discovery.

Notification should be made by telephone during normal working hours to:

Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality
(402) 471-2186
or
Twin Platte Natural Resources District
(308) 535-8080

After hours or on weekends and holidays, notification should be made to the Nebraska State Patrol.

Notification should include (if known) the time of occurrence, quantity and type of material, location, and any corrective or cleanup actions presently being taken.

Equipment Requirements:

Six specific equipment requirements are included in the laws relating to chemigation. These items must be in place before any system is approved for a permit, and must also be in place and in use during any application.

MAINLINE CHECK VALVE:

An irrigation line check valve must be located in the pipeline between the irrigation pump and the point of chemical injection into the irrigation pipeline. The check valve must stop the water and chemicals from draining or siphoning back into the irrigation well. The check valve must have a positive closing action and a watertight seal. It should be easy to repair and maintain.

VACUUM RELIEF VALVE:

A vacuum relief valve must be located on the pipeline between the irrigation pump and the mainline check valve. The valve allows air into the pipeline when the water flow stops, preventing a vacuum that could cause siphoning.

INSPECTION PORT:

An inspection port must be located between the irrigation pump discharge and the mainline check valve. The inspection port enables the operator to make a visual inspection for possible leaks of the check valve. The vacuum relief valve connection often serves as the inspection port.

AUTOMATIC LOW PRESSURE DRAIN:

The low pressure drain, made of corrosion-resistant material and having at least a three-quarter inch orifice, must be located on the bottom of the horizontal pipe between the irrigation pump and the irrigation pipeline check valve. The drain must discharge at least 20 feet from the water source. The drain inlet should not extend beyond the inside surface of the pipe unless a check dam is also present. This drain will help keep any water/chemical mixture away from the irrigation water source if the mainline valve leaks.

CHEMICAL INJECTION LINE CHECK VALVE:

A chemical injection line check valve must be located between the point of chemical injection into the irrigation pipeline and the chemical injection pump. This valve shall be chemical resistant. With a minimum opening of 10 psi, this check valve is needed to stop the flow of water from the irrigation system into the chemical supply tank, and to prevent gravity flow from the chemical supply tank through the injection pump and into the irrigation pipeline after a system shutdown.

SIMULTANEOUS INTERLOCK DEVICE:

The irrigation pump and the chemical injection pump need to be interlocked so that if the irrigation pump stops, the chemical injection pump will also stop. The interlock may be electrical or mechanical. This interlock prevents the pumping of chemicals from the supply tank into the irrigation pipeline after the irrigation pump stops.

EQUIPMENT CHANGES:

The Twin Platte Natural Resources District should be notified within 72 hours of any replacement or alterations involving chemigation equipment. The Twin Platte Natural Resources District must then make an inspection. If compliant, the permit will be continued. If the equipment does not comply, the permit must be suspended until compliance is achieved and the Twin Platte Natural Resources District gives approval to the permit.

AS REQUIRED BY LAW, THE TWIN PLATTE NATURAL RESOURCES DISTRICT WILL CONDUCT AREA-WIDE, SELECTIVE, AND PERIODIC INSPECTIONS TO ENSURE CHEMIGATION ACT COMPLIANCE.

Types of Chemigation Permits:

By state law, a chemigation permit MUST be obtained before any person can legally chemigate. Chemigation refers to the injection of any ag chemical, including fertilizer, into irrigation water.

PERMITS EXPIRE JUNE 1ST THAT WERE ISSUED THE PREVIOUS YEAR:

Renewals can be obtained by submitting permit applications by that date.

Renewal permits for each site can be issued without an inspection; however, the Twin Platte Natural Resources District is required to reinspect systems in operation on a regular basis.

To renew, enclose $20.00 with your completed application form sent to the Twin Platte Natural Resources District, PO Box 1347, North Platte, NE 69103-1347.

Renewal applications received after the permit expires on June 1 must comply with provisions for new permits, including a fee of $40.00 and a required inspection before the permit can be issued.

NEW PERMITS:

The fee for a new permit is $40.00, which must be enclosed with the application to the Twin Platte Natural Resources District, PO Box 1347, North Platte, NE 69103-1347. Permit application forms can be obtained from the same office address.

Twin Platte Natural Resources District will review completed applications, then conduct an inspection of the system. Approval (or denial) of the application is required within 45 days after the application is filed.

EMERGENCY PERMITS:

An emergency permit, costing $100.00 and valid for 45 days, may be issued by the Twin Platte Natural Resources District, which has 48 hours to act on an application for such a permit. Such permitholders must comply with all chemigation rules and regulations.

INSPECTIONS:

A chemigation system must be inspected before a new permit may be issued, and periodic inspections are required for systems under a renewal permit to ensure compliance with the Chemigation Act.

NEW PERMIT INSPECTION:

The system is required to be started, brought to normal operating pressure, and shut down.

A permitholder or applicator must be present during the Twin Platte Natural Resources District inspection. The Twin Platte Natural Resources District staff will not operate any irrigation or chemigation equipment, nor will they open any electrical control box.

PERIODIC RE-INSPECTION:

To meet the Chemigation Act requirements that each Natural Resources District conducts area-wide for both selective and periodic inspections, the Twin Platte Natural Resources District requires a full inspection, which involves a start-up and shutdown of the chemigation system, to be performed a minimum of once every four years.

NON-PERMITTED CHEMIGATION SYSTEMS:

The Twin Platte Natural Resources District is also required by law to make area-wide selective and periodic inspections of non-permitted irrigation systems. The Twin Platte Natural Resources District will also investigate complaints concerning non-permitted systems.

In cases of non-compliance and subsequent lack of cooperation by an irrigator, the Twin Platte Natural Resources District may apply to the district court or county court in which the irrigation system is located, for an inspection warrant to allow the Twin Platte Natural Resources District’s employees entry onto the irrigator’s property to carry out duties under the Chemigation Act.